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Philippines kids goes back to school for the first time since Covid

Philippines kids goes back to school for the first time since Covid

  • The Covid-19 outbreak in the Philippines was one of the worst in South East Asia.
  • Around 24,000 nation’s public schools will conduct five days of in-person instruction.
  • Some schools will have to split up courses into shifts due to lack of classrooms.

After one of the longest school closures in history, millions of pupils across the Philippines went back to school on Monday.

After more than two years of distant learning, about half of the country’s schools started holding regular in-person classes again.

After Covid, the Philippines was among the last few nations to switch back to in-person instruction.

The extended stoppage of in-person instruction, according to some analysts, has exacerbated the nation’s education crisis.

Less than half of the nation’s public schools, or around 24,000, will conduct five days of in-person instruction.

Education officials said that until November, when all 27 million registered students are anticipated to return to the classroom full-time, the remaining campuses will provide a combination of in-person and online classes.

According to the Department of Education, certain schools will have to split up courses into shifts due to a lack of classrooms and to prevent overcrowding out of concern that schools could become new virus hotspots.

Fears of the virus spreading quickly in a nation where it is usual for youngsters to live with parents and elderly grandparents have been blamed for the prolonged school closures.

Online courses, written materials, and lessons aired on television and social media have taken the place of in-person instruction.

With nearly three million infections and 50,000 fatalities, the Covid-19 outbreak in the Philippines was one of the worst in South East Asia.
After two years of Zoom sessions, sixth-grader Sophia Macahilig said she was “eager” to meet her classmates and instructors on Monday at San Pedro Elementary School in Manila.

The 11-year-old told news agency AFP, “We used to have fun, and now I can have fun again.

Other students lined up to receive a dollop of hand sanitizer, have their temperatures taken, and then enter the school grounds while wearing uniforms and masks.

However, there are still unanswered questions regarding how the past 2.5 years of online learning have impacted children’s educational growth, particularly at a time when many kids were already having difficulty meeting the pre-pandemic literacy norms.

Before the epidemic, a World Bank survey from last year found that nine out of ten Filipino youngsters “could not read a simple text with comprehension” by the age of 10.

According to a statement from the organization UNICEF, “Prolonged school closures, poor health risk mitigation, and household-income shocks had the biggest impact on learning poverty.”

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